Tag Archives: Arlington

Tidbit for Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012

Pricing some books this morning and fell prey to the occupational hazard of browsing instead of pricing. A riddle from “Folklore On The American Land” ($5.00 at the store):

‘What is the difference between a deer fleeing from its pursuers and a decrepit witch? One is a hunted stag, the other a stunted hag.’

I love books. Every day is like Christmas – you never know what you are going to find!

Let’s Go To The Book Fair!

Why attend an Antiquarian book fair? What is a book fair?

A book fair is a place where various booksellers gather in one location and display some of their very best and most interesting materials. Why do booksellers bring their best? Because book fairs usually last for only a day or two, and booksellers have to pack and move books to the book fair, unpack and shelve the books, then pack up and move the books back to their shop where they are unpacked and shelved yet again. So, in order to get the most “bang” for their efforts, booksellers tend to bring books that are of a better quality or may be a little more scarce, and usually carry a higher price tag than more common books.

You will find a wide variety of books in a relatively small space at a book fair. Even a small fair will have thirty or more booksellers exhibiting their treasures. A collector can connect with dozens of booksellers from all over, looking over the merchandise and inquiring about any titles they might be looking for. The books range from very old to almost new, in a wide range of conditions and prices. People even collect books for their bindings, some of which are a work of art in themselves.

Even if you are not a collector (yet), go to a book fair if you can. There is usually a small admission charge, but it is well worth the minimal expense. Look for books by a favorite author, or books you read as a child or youth. How about dust jacket cover artwork? Look at the various types of book bindings to be found, particularly on some of the old leather-bound books you will see. Talk to the booksellers and other customers. Most booksellers have a favorite author, famous person, subject or genre. I know of one bookseller whose favorite author is Jane Austen, and another who loves anything about the history of the Roosevelt family, particularly Teddy Roosevelt. Some booksellers specialize in rare books, others in fine bindings. You will see booths full of poetry, science fiction or vintage children’s books. At some book fairs, such as those sponsored by the Vermont Antiquarian Booksellers Association, you will see dealers of art, postcards, maps, pamphlets and other ephemera such as vintage advertising art, magazines and comic books.

2012 VERMONT SPRING BOOK & EPHEMERA FAIR
is Sunday, March 25, 10 A.M. to 4 P.M
at Sheraton Hotel
870 Williston Road
I-89 Exit 14-W Burlington, Vermont
Sponsored by Vermont Antiquarian Booksellers Association

SEE YOU THERE!

How To Deface Your Books (and make them worthless).

This article is part advice and part confession. I believe that at one time or another I have managed to perform at least several acts of desecration upon a book. Thankfully, they have not involved the use of human waste products. On the other hand, I am pretty sure that I have destroyed a book in a way that few others will have done.  More on that later.

Right at the top of my list of how to deface and devaluate a book is highlighting, underlining and annotation. Especially if done using a highlighter or pen. I used to do this as a student but found myself highlighting/underlining half the book. I eventually figured out that this was actually detrimental to my learning. You tend to ignore the parts that aren’t highlighted, which may actually turn out to be an important section you forgot to mark. Or, if you actually do the unthinkable and try to re-read the text again, you will miss new information because your eyes will be drawn to the highlighting instead of to something new. I feel that highlighting, underlining and annotation are signs of intellectual laziness. Don’t do it – don’t give in to lazy.

For myself, I eventually found that I learned better by writing notes in my own way in a separate notebook or on a separate sheet of paper stored in a loose-leaf binder. This technique requires you to actually think about the material and condense it into something that can be reviewed in much less time than it takes to re-read all of that highlighted text. This also works well in a lecture setting, and forces you to actually listen to and not just hear the lecture.

I put the title/author at the top of the page and when I find something interesting that I want to remember, I write the page number at the left, or use some other kind of outline scheme. Play around until you find the layout that works for you. Copy the section of interest, or even better, condense it into your own words. You will be amazed at how much more material you can retain in your brain. Plus, you get to have a nice clean book that you can read again, or you can pass it on to others for their enjoyment. Or, in the case of textbooks, sell them for cash. I always laughed at the kids who would buy a pre-highlighted textbook. How did they know whether the former owner aced the class? Maybe some dummy highlighted all the wrong stuff? It’s much safer and easier in the long run to just do your own work.

Another thing I used to do to my books was put my name in them or even worse, write it on the edge of the pages. I was more inclined to do this with textbooks than in my other books. I would like to say I stopped this practice long before I became a bookseller, but it would not be true.  In my earlier days as a bookseller, about ten years ago, I had an open shop for about three years. I had some old hardcover westerns that were ex-library and in pretty rough shape, so I decided that they should never be allowed to grace my shelves again. So, I marked really low prices in pen inside the covers, so no one could bring them in to sell to me again.  Not knowing that some of them, even in the rough condition they were in, still had some value. I believe I sold them by the box. Ten years later, I still come across some of those books that I had sold so cheap. Sometimes I buy them back. And mentally kick myself or cringe every time I see a book that I defaced like this.

Now, all my pricing gets written using a light touch on the pencil. I also use a softer lead; one with an ‘S’ after the number. I avoid the hard leads with an ‘H’ after the number; you will engrave the price permanently into the paper trying to make it legible.

Another way to mistreat a book is to fold down the corner of a page as a bookmark. Again, this is another bad habit I used to indulge in. Does wisdom really come with age?

Yet another mistreatment. When reading your paperback, fold it back so that the covers meet. that way you can read it and keep one hand free. On of my customers, God rest his soul, used to get mad at me when I would not take his destroyed books in trade. The books would be in nearly new condition when they went out the door, but looked like they had been through the washer and dryer – totally trashed.

Last but no least, that other story.

When I was in college I struggled my way through differential calculus and managed to slide by with a D-, not good enough to get credit for the course. Paid all that money just to fail the course. I kept that stupid textbook for years, even after I later re-took the course at another school and passed. I eventually gave the book away but came across it several years later at the local library book sale (it had my name written on the edge of the pages). I found that I still harbored resentment toward that book. So I bought it. I then took it out to a local gravel pit and shot big holes in it with a .357 Magnum. I felt good. And maybe just a tiny little bit guilty.

Taking Out The Trash

I recycle my un-saleable books at our local recycling center, still affectionately known to locals as The Dump. One time I was there throwing out boxes of old, ratty, mass market paperbacks, heaving them into the paper recycling bin. An older lady waited until I had finished my chore, then proceeded to climb right into the bin and start to heave most of them back out. I asked her what she thought she was doing. She said she was getting them for one of the local non-profits who had a free book-exchange shelf. I know darn well that I ended up rejecting those books all over again from hopeful sellers. At one point I even started tearing them up to discourage the dump-picking. Looking back, I don’t know who was crazier, her for picking books out of a dumpster, or me for being so anal about keeping those books from coming back to my store.

Another time I got a call from a guy who swore he had a van full of nothing but ‘primo’ books in great condition – very valuable. He said he needed money to pay his bills.

After an hour’s drive, this guy wheeled into the parking lot in a van so loaded the bumper scraped the road when he made the turn. He had over forty cartons of books, which he proceeded to unload onto the front porch. It took me over four hours to sort through the stuff, hoping in vain to find something decent, but most of the boxes were full of damp, mildewed books, mouse crap, mold and dirt. I bought about thirty books and that only because I felt sorry for him. He was trying to sell stuff out of those boxes to my customers for several hours before I made him load up and leave. Another lesson learned.

As an aside to this story, I have found through much experience that people who bring books in using big old trash bags are usually bringing just that – trash. I have found that the time and labor involved in going through the bags is usually not worth it. However, neatly packed and stacked books in shopping books are usually much better. But the best thing I love to see coming into my store are nice clean books in clean, neatly packed boxes.